Prison Ministry

Prison Outreach is an on-going, integral part of the Contemplative Outreach family. This important ministry is committed to support volunteers and organizations willing to serve the prison population.

A Conversion... and A Call to Serve

Series: 
Voices of Community

This letter is my response to questions that were asked at our Centering Prayer circle:

  • What can we say about the experience of inmates in learning and practicing this method?
  • What do we think is important for the wider organization to understand about this perspective?

What can we say about the experience of inmates in learning and practicing this method?

I have spent a lot of time in prayer and reflection with these questions.  The following is the fruit of my labors.  I pray that through my words you will find insight and perspective, and that we may come into unity in the Holy Spirit as we sit together at the feet of the Lord Jesus.

 

Dear Sisters and Brothers of Contemplative Outreach,

This letter is my response to questions that were asked at our Centering Prayer circle [in prison]:

  • What can we say about the experience of inmates in learning and practicing this method?
  • What do we think is important for the wider organization to understand about this perspective?

What can we say about the experience of inmates in learning and practicing this method?

Book Review: Find God Within, Contemplative Prayer for Prisoners

Series: 
Other

At last it’s here!  A book on centering prayer for prisoners and jail inmates that is theologically sound, spiritually grounded, scripturally based, and personally healing!

FINDING GOD WITHIN by RAYMOND LEONARDINI
Reviewed by: Sister Catherine Marie Bazar, O.P.,
   Chaplain, Twin Towers Correctional Facility, Los Angeles, CA.

At last it’s here!  A book on centering prayer for prisoners and jail inmates that is theologically sound, spiritually grounded, scripturally based, and personally healing!

Category: 

Contemplative Outreach and Prison Contemplative Fellowship, A New Partnership

Series: 
Other

Prison Contemplative Fellowship is an affiliation of prisoners, former prisoners, their families, volunteers, and prison chaplains whose focus is the support of Centering Prayer practice in prisons and jails.

Prison Contemplative Fellowship is an affiliation of prisoners, former prisoners, their families, volunteers, and prison chaplains whose focus is the support of Centering Prayer practice in prisons and jails. Prisoners are a distinctive population for receiving the fruits of Centering Prayer. While they generally do not have a high formal educational status, prisoners hold more experiences of life at its depth. They carry deep material of suffering, emotional trauma, early childhood abuse, abandonment, betrayal, and lucid memories of the devastation caused by rampant addictions.

Category: 

The Welcoming Prayer: Deepening Our Practice of Letting Go and Letting

Series: 
Voices of Community

My name is Michael Erwin. I have been doing Centering Prayer on a daily basis for several years during my incarceration at San Quentin State Prison. I have found that Centering Prayer goes beyond all other forms of meditation that I have done in my life.

My name is Michael Erwin. I have been doing Centering Prayer on a daily basis for several years during my incarceration at San Quentin State Prison. I have found that Centering Prayer goes beyond all other forms of meditation that I have done in my life. For me, Centering Prayer truly is a gift from God, a path that leads to God transforming my mind and my heart. This is a simple practice where we simply surrender to God and sit silently in His loving presence.

Blessings from Behind the Bars: Centering Prayer in Prison

Series: 
Voices of Community

In 2006, my late wife, Kate, four other psychotherapists, a cognitive behavioral trainer, and myself began a program at Travis County Correctional Center in Austin entitled LifeTools©. It provided psychological, cognitive behavioral, and spiritual direction for over 200 men until 2009, when the program ended.

In 2006, my late wife, Kate, four other psychotherapists, a cognitive behavioral trainer, and myself began a program at Travis County Correctional Center in Austin entitled LifeTools©. It provided psychological, cognitive behavioral, and spiritual direction for over 200 men until 2009, when the program ended.